A streetcar named desire commentary

Tennessee Williams Background and Themes Tennessee Williams was one of the greatest and most well-known American playwrights of the twentieth century.

Tennessee wrote numerous plays during his life; and of those the most well-known and recognized is his play entitled, A Streetcar Named Desire. To show how societies view of the individual, tradition, and the victim is flawed.

During a meeting between the two, Blanche confesses to Mitch that once she was married to a young man, Allan Grey, whom she later discovered in a sexual encounter with an older man.

A Streetcar Named Desire Critical Essays

Blanche has suffered a complete mental breakdown and is to be committed to a mental hospital. Since the suicide of A streetcar named desire commentary beloved husband, who killed himself after she discovered he was gay, Blanche has been in terrified, alcoholic flight from reality.

Not knowing that Stanley is listening, Blanche holds nothing back and describes Stanley as a common, apelike, primitive brute. Stanley, in return, does not care for Blanche's manners and dislikes her presence.

Blanche had married when she was very young, but her husband died, leaving her widowed and alone. The Social Conflict Between Appearance and Reality Blanche had freedom of expression, but only at the inward disdain of the others.

It is however the web of fantasy and concealment which Blanche had previously spun about herself and which Stanley had ruthlessly exposed which made it easier for Stella to believe that Blanche's account of being raped by her husband was a final lie too far.

In her role as a "belle," Blanche requires the protection and chivalry of those around her, an expectation that she will be waited on and maintained, without being expected to contribute, other than by the grace of her presence.

When a doctor and a matron arrive to take Blanche to the hospital, she initially resists them and collapses on the floor in confusion. The story touches Mitch, who tells Blanche that they need each other. During the time period in which the play was set, New Orleans was transforming from the old "aristocratic" south to the new "industrialized" south.

Stanley overhears the conversation but keeps silent. Therefore, Blanche puts forth much effort in attempt to attract the attention of young men; for example, she never appears in the light in order to hide her actual age.

Her identity was found through Stanley. Belle Reve Belle Reve bel rev. Williams wrote in a way so as to pull at the hearts of those in the audience.

In the end, Stanley went so far as to have Blanche sent off to a mental asylum. Thus her loving desire becomes brutal desire, unloving desire. Blanche is in her thirties and, with no money, has nowhere else to go. Blanche represented the "dying out" of the old south.

He designed the play to show how the social structure of the South offered little protection for women.

As the weeks pass, Blanche and Stanley continue to not get along. The story touches Mitch, who tells Blanche that they need each other. In her role as a "belle," Blanche requires the protection and chivalry of those around her, an expectation that she will be waited on and maintained, without being expected to contribute, other than by the grace of her presence.

It includes numerous social conflict undertones which give it relevance, depth, and meaning. However, she never commits to act for Stella because that would require rebelling against Stanley's authority.

A Streetcar Named Desire: Social Conflict Analysis

She begins to look something like a heroine. The audience is allowed to share Blanche's view and past struggles.

Literary Criticism of “A Streetcar Named Desire”

Because of these factors, Williams had a well-developed "feminine side"; he later became an active homosexual Baym, Mitch, present at the poker game, breaks down in tears. While looking at the papers, Stanley notices a bundle of letters that Blanche emotionally proclaims are personal love letters from her dead husband.

As the weeks pass, Blanche and Stanley continue to not get along. Blanche's Demise As her fantasies cave in around her, Blanche becomes increasingly isolated. From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes A Streetcar Named Desire Study Guide has everything you need to ace quizzes, tests, and essays.

A Streetcar Named Desire Questions and Answers. The Question and Answer section for A Streetcar Named Desire is a great resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel.

A Streetcar Named Desire is a very powerful and thought-provoking play, with characters who breathe strong emotion throughout, making the scenes really come to life. It is no wonder that this epic play was made into a fine classic film with Marlon Brando as Stanley and Vivien Leigh as mobile-concrete-batching-plant.coms: In the novel ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ by Tennessee Williams, a scene that often catches the attention of readers is the poker scene.

A Streetcar Named Desire Analysis

It begins when Blanche and Stella return from seeing a show too early, not wanting to have been a distraction or a nuisance while the men played poker. Dec 01,  · Blanche DuBois: Why, they told me to take a streetcar named Desire and then transfer to one called Cemetery and ride six blocks and get off at Elysian Fields.

Goofs Stanley says that Louisiana utilizes the Napoleonic Code (which was promulgated a year after the Louisiana Purchase).8/10(K). Specifically, A Streetcar Named Desire is a commentary on the social changes taking place during the first half of the 20th century due to industrialization and immigration.

A streetcar named desire commentary
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